Books for Collectors

The Book of Griswold & Wagner
by David Smith and Chuck Wafford

Reviewed by Robert Reed (Antique and Collectible News Service)

There are more pictures, more values, and more of everything that is cast iron cookware in the latest edition of The Book of Griswold & Wagner.

The new fifth edition also includes Sidney Hollow Ware, Favorite, and Wapak, as well as patent lists.

Encyclopedia in nature, it rattles the antique pots and pans including ashtrays and smoke sets, cornstick pans, griddles, Dutch ovens, coffee grinders and roasters, trivets, molds, broilers, sad irons, fluters, tobacco cutters, lard presses, hot plates, lemon squeezers, patty bowls, skillets, cuspidors, teapots, waffle irons, and similar items of the kitchen past.

More than 1,000 photographs help document variations of shape, size, hardware types, production dates, catalog numbers, and various other markings.

“Griswold Manufacturing Company of Erie, Pennsylvania, and the Wagner Manufacturing Company of Sidney, Ohio, became the world leaders in hollow ware production,” note the authors in the book’s

introduction.

“Because of the large volume and diversity of their products, each became a household name. A major portion of this book is devoted to these leaders in the industry.”

Chapters in the volume are arranged by company from Griswold to Wapak Hollowware Company. Each company-related chapter includes a brief history of the individual company.

The book includes a separate index for Griswold, Wagner, Sidney Hollow Ware, Favorite Piqua Ware, and Wapak Hollow Ware.

Authors are David G. Smith and Chuck Wafford. Smith, known as the The Pan Man, is both a collector and dealer of cast iron cookware.

Wafford—known in the collecting world as “Cast Iron Charlie”—is a nationally known Griswold collector and appraiser.

The Book of Griswold & Wagner by David Smith and Chuck Wafford, soft cover, 328 pages, black and white illustrations, $34.99 plus shipping from Schiffer Publishing, www.schifferbooks.com.


 

It’s All About Accessories, For the World’s Most Fashionable Dolls 1959-1972

by Hillary Shilkitus James

Reviewed by Robert Reed (Antique and Collectible News Service)

What else for the world’s most fashionable doll than a book about Barbie doll accessories?

This charming book lists more than 1,700 tiny accessories for Barbie, Skipper, Francie, Ken and others for the years 1959 through 1972.

“When a collector today tries to put together an outfit, they soon find out that the bulk of the value lies in the shoes, hats, gloves, jewelry, and other important accessories,” notes author Hillary Shilkitus James.

“A missing necklace can sometimes be worth $50, when the total value of the complete outfit is only $75.”

The book is arranged into chapters that deal with individual accessories that may have involved more than one Barbie character. For example the chapter on hats includes those worn by Barbie, Ken, Francie, Skipper and Tutti and Todd.

All of the hundreds of Barbie-related accessories in this extensive book are color illustrated and list a current value. And values vary considerably.

Ken’s striped Saturday Day tie lists at $15 but a gold metal trophy that came with Barbie Poodle Parade is valued at $125.

 

It’s All About Accessories, For the World’s Most Fashionable Dolls 1959-1972 by Hillary Shilkitus James, hardcover, color illustrated, 352 pages, $49.99 plus shipping from Schiffer Publishing, www.schifferbooks.com.


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